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What are the Most Common Shareholder Dispute Claims in Palm Harbor, Florida?

Shareholders have a stake in the success of a company’s stocks. This is why these disputes are commonplace, more common than many imagine. Disputes arise when one shareholder believes that another has violated their responsibility to the company by not acting as they should. For example, shareholders may dispute buying or selling their share of stock without informing other shareholders and without paying them the right amount for the stock. It is more than essential to have a Palm Harbor commercial litigation attorney by your side during a shareholder dispute claim.

The following are the most common shareholder dispute claims in Florida.

  • Breach of Fiduciary duty

A breach of fiduciary duty occurs when the owner of a company fails to act in the best interest of shareholders. They are not acting in the interest of all shareholders. For example, if one shareholder tries to sell their shares without informing the other shareholders and without paying them the price they deserve, then there has been a breach of fiduciary duty. This is generally considered to be a bad thing for all shareholders.

  • Corporate officer self-dealing

Corporate officer self-dealing occurs when a company officer does something that benefits them personally without the knowledge of other shareholders. For example, if one shareholder buys shares in the company without informing another shareholder and without paying them the correct amount for the stock, then there has been a breach of fiduciary duty.

  • Shareholder derivative lawsuits

Shareholder derivative lawsuits are lawsuits filed by one shareholder who believes that another has violated their responsibilities to the company by not acting as they should. For example, if one shareholder buys shares in the company, but does not inform other shareholders and does not pay them the correct amount for their stock, then there has been a breach of fiduciary duty.

  • Shareholder oppression claims

Shareholder oppression claims occur when a shareholder believes that another has done something to them in an attempt to force them out of the company. For example, if a shareholder buys shares in a company but then tries to force other shareholders out of the way in order to take over the position, then there has been a breach of fiduciary duty.

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